Archive | book review RSS feed for this section
Image

Called to Controversy

2 Sep

called to controversy

 

 

Called to Controversy, by Ruth Rosen, is the biography of Moishe Rosen, Ruth’s father and the founder of Jews for Jesus. Ruth has done a thorough job researching, and then sharing, about her fathers upbringing, his conversion to Christianity and later founding of Jews for Jesus. Ruth has described family members etc. in great detail, and one can get a real “feel” about them and the time they lived in. However, this book was hard going at times, perhaps too much information has been put in to it. I had read each evening for a good week, and when I looked at the progress bar on my Kindle, I discovered that I was only a third of the way through! It took me a good couple of months to read this book and, to be honest, I still haven’t completely finished it. This is a biography, so if people are looking for information about Messianic Jew conversion, then I suggest you look elsewhere. However, if you want to learn more about Jews for Jesus and its founder, then this is the right book for you.

 

Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from the publisher through the BookSneeze®.com <http://BookSneeze®.com> book review bloggers program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255 <http://www.access.gpo.gov/nara/cfr/waisidx_03/16cfr255_03.html> : “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

Book Review – Tyndale

18 Jan

Tyndale – The Man Who Gave God an English Voice is a superb book authored by David Teems. Teems book tells the story of the fight Tyndale and had with the  Catholic Church and others to translate the Bible into English, so that English speaking people could read or hear the Bible in their own language and understand it, rather than just having the Latin version. During this treacherous  period Henry VIII was King of England and Martin Luther was writing texts, including his 95 Thesis.

Teems shows in his book how translating the Bible into English was a dangerous thing for Tyndale to embark upon. He was labelled a heretic and ended up in exile, in Germany, for eleven years, until he was betrayed and ultimately executed. Tyndale found himself with a lot of enemies due to his persistence to translate the Bible, including Sir Thomas More.

I really enjoyed reading this book and have to confess that I knew little about Tyndale prior to this. I didn’t realise that before the KJV, Tyndale had already published the New Testament in English. Also, through his translation, Tyndale introduced many new words into the English language. Sadly, within months of Tyndale’s death, the publication of an English Bible was granted by the King.

Teems has researched and written this book incredibly well. I have learned so much, not only about Tyndale, but also about the early Reformation and the cost to the men who persevered with what they believed to be right. The people against his translation made have thought they had silenced Tyndale, with his execution, but, Tyndale’s legacy lives on today. 

I received this book free from the publisher through the BookSneeze.com book review program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255 : “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising


 

The Voice New Testament – Book Review

3 Nov

The Voice New Testament translation is the result of 27 Bible scholars, 51 writers and 36 other contributors, who have captured the New Testament in a beautiful and narrative way. Bible scholars include David Capes, Darrell Bock and Peter Davids and writers include Chris Seay, Leonard Sweet and Lauren Winner.

When I received my copy of The Voice NT, I was expecting something along the same lines as Eugene Peterson’s The Message. While the translation is in contemporary language, I was pleasantly surprised at how The Voice differs from The Message. The Voice is set out in a screenplay format, indicating the person who is speaking. For example:

Disciple: It’s a ghost!

Another Disciple: A ghost? What will we do?

Jesus: Be still. It is I. You have nothing to fear. (Matt 14:26-27)

I really like the design and format of the book. Throughout the books of the NT, there are notes for the reader, that explain some of the culture/situations found in the NT, or asks the reader to think about a particular thing. There are also four different reading lists – readings for Advent, readings for Lent and Easter, read the NT in 24 weeks and daily readings for personal growth. Other information, included in The Voice, is a detailed explanation as to how this translation was come up with, a topical guide and information about the titles of Jesus. Some of the language used is truly beautiful. I love how Jesus is referred to as Jesus, the Anointed One.

My husband is a church pastor and he has looked through The Voice NT. He has said that he really likes it, so much so, that he has taken my copy and placed it on his bed side table! The only draw back to The Voice is that it is just NT, although, from the back I can see that the complete Bible is set for release in 2012.

Here are a few lines of scripture from The Voice, compared with The Message and NIV, so that you can see the comparisons and difference:

“Here is the bottom line: do not worry about your life. Don’t worry about what you will eat or what you will drink. Don’t worry about how you clothe your body. Living is about more than merely eating, and the body is about more than dressing up. Look at the birds in the sky. They do not store food for winter. They don’t plant gardens. They do not sow or reap – and yet, they are always fed because your heavenly Father feeds them. And you are even more precious to Him than a beautiful bird.. If He looks after them, of course He will look after you.” Matt 6:25-26 The Voice NT

“If you decide for God, living a life of God-worship, it follows that you don’t fuss about what’s on the table at mealtimes or whether the clothes in your closet are in fashion. There is far more to your life than the food you put in your stomach, more to your outer appearance than the clothes you hang on your body. Look at the birds, free and unfettered, not tied down to a job description, careless in the care of God. And you count far more to him than birds.” Matt 6:25-26 The Message

“Therefore I tell you, do not worry about your life, what you will eat or drink; or about your body, what you will wear. Is not life more than food, and the body more than clothes?  Look at the birds of the air; they do not sow or reap or store away in barns, and yet your heavenly Father feeds them. Are you not much more valuable than they?” Matt 6:25-26  NIV

I really recommend reading The Voice NT. It would also be a good starter bible for a new Christian, or for a teen moving to an adult Bible. I think, though, if you are someone who enjoys reading a translation such as the KJV, then you may struggle with the contemporary feel to The Voice, or, it might be a breath of fresh air!

Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from the publisher through the BookSneeze®.com <http://BookSneeze®.com> book review bloggers program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255 <http://www.access.gpo.gov/nara/cfr/waisidx_03/16cfr255_03.html> : “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

Three Cups – Book Review

12 Oct

Three Cups is a beautiful book, written for children, teaching them how to save, spend and give. The idea behind the book is that it instills in children good money habits from a young age. The publisher does not give an age range for this book, but Amazon advertises it for children 4-8 years old. Personally, I don’t think a four-year old will understand some of the concepts used in the book – such as bank interest, however they will enjoy the brightly colored pictures and story. I read this book with my daughter, who has recently turned ten. Although a little young for her, she did enjoy the book, but was disappointed that it was short! The book is 32 pages in length.

The story basically follows a young boy who was given three cups by his parents, one for saving, one for spending and one for giving. As he is given his allowance each week he equally splits the money between the three cups. After a period of time his mother takes him to open a bank savings account to put the money from the savings cup in. The boy is able to save up his spending money and buy a mitt that he wants. He then goes on to donate his giving money. This same scenario continues as the boy grows and as he becomes 18 the reader can see what he puts his bank savings money towards.

Authors Tony Townsley and Mark St. Germain have written a fabulous book that will introduce kids to saving, spending and giving. We live in a part of the world where kids want all the time, and often get without having to save up their own money. I know my own kids seem to think that money grows on trees! By introducing the concept to them that they can save money, spend some and give some away, at a young age, will stand them in good stead for the future.

At the back of the book there is also some guidance for parents who want to integrate the three cup method into their family.

Awesome book, highly recommend it!

Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from the publisher through the BookSneeze®.com book review bloggers program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255 : “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

Fresh-Brewed Life Book Review

2 Oct

Fresh-Brewed Life: A Stirring Invitation to Wake Up Your Soul, is an updated re-release of a book by the same title that Nicole Johnson released ten years ago. In this book the author addresses issues that touch on women’s lives today. Topics include longings, embracing your beauty, anger, sexuality, friendships, freedom and surrender to God. There is also a chapter about journaling, which encourages the reader to write out prayers, thoughts and emotions.

The chapter that stood out to me the most was the one on embracing your beauty. The author really tackles the tension women have through the media, through men and other women about how they should look, what size dress they should wear and so on.

I didn’t particularly get a lot out of this book. It is not that the theme was bad, I think a lot of the topics are things that I’ve read a lot about recently so I have read nothing new. I also didn’t really gel with the authors writing style. The book was slow going in places and I found myself skipping pages to move it on a bit. This book has been well received by many and must be merited for that. It just hasn’t been the book for me. Would I recommend it to others? Yes, I would, as it has some practical life solutions within it.

Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from the publisher through the BookSneeze®.com book review bloggers program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255 : “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

%d bloggers like this: